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Abstract

Volume 18, Issue 3 (May 2016) 18, 350–355; DOI:10.4103/1008-682X.178857

Recent advances in the genetics of testicular failure

Seung-Hun Song1, Koji Chiba1, Ranjith Ramasamy2, Dolores J Lamb1

1 Center for Reproductive Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas; Scott Department of Urology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA
2 Department of Urology, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, FL, USA

Correspondence: Dr. DJ Lamb (dlamb@bcm.edu)

05-Apr-2016

Abstract

Infertility affects approximately 15% of couples, and male factor is responsible for 30%-50% of all infertility. The most severe form of male infertility is testicular failure, and the typical phenotype of testicular failure is severely impaired spermatogenesis resulting in azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia. Although the etiology of testicular failure remains poorly understood, genetic factor typically is an underlying cause. Modern assisted reproductive techniques have revolutionized the treatment of male factor infertility, allowing biological fatherhood to be achieved by many men who would otherwise have been unable to become father to their children through natural conception. Therefore, identifying genetic abnormalities in male is critical because of the potential risk of transmission of genetic abnormalities to the offspring. Recently, along with other intense researches ongoing, whole-genome approaches have been used increasingly in the genetic studies of male infertility. In this review, we focus on the genetics of testicular failure and provide an update on the advances in the study of genetics of male infertility.

Keywords: azoospermia; genetics; male infertility; testicular failure

Keywords: Keywords: azoospermia; genetics; male infertility; testicular failure

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